Training

February 9th, 2013 - Posted by The Mariner
It was recently suggested to me that I write about the expectations surrounding our lives and work at sea, in the hope that I can prevent a few people who are looking to start a cadetship from being disappointed by how things might appear and who knows maybe even give a little advice to th...
January 26th, 2013 - Posted by The Mariner
This post is about the final exam* we have to pass in order to become fully qualified Officers, the dreaded “orals” an oral exam conducted by a Master Mariner. The following is my recollection of my exam taken in 2009, which feels like a millennium ago now! Engineer cadets also...
January 24th, 2013 - Posted by The Mariner
BAR. Is the usual place onboard for people to relax and socialise together and have a few beers. Some may care to relax more than others, overindulgence (the engineers!!) followed by the inability to get up in the morning for work means you may not be allowed any more beer for a period of ...
January 24th, 2013 - Posted by The Mariner
SEA WATCHES. Do not be late. Uniform during the day and clean casual clothes at night, unless it’s stations, then it’s uniform again. Always have a large notebook on the bridge with you to write copious notes, it makes things so much easier. Nobody believes a cadet when they say “I...
January 24th, 2013 - Posted by The Mariner
STUDY. We know you have an awful lot to do. We will all help you, encourage you and teach you. You are entitled to a minimum of eight hours study a week; this really applies when away from the coast and when things are a bit quieter. Keep a record of your study time and […]...
January 22nd, 2013 - Posted by The Mariner
CABIN. Your cabin is your own space and you are to keep it clean and tidy. Feel free to add a little bit of character, posters, plants, pictures etc. Do not bang nails into the bulkhead please. Your cabin is one of the few places on board you may smoke freely, the bar is the […]...
January 22nd, 2013 - Posted by The Mariner
Welcome onboard, Get settled in your cabin, you’ll be shown around the ship soon, promptly forgetting most of what you see and are told. Always carry your small notebook, we all have them, and learn to write down anything you think relevant and can read up on later, or are told to write ...
January 22nd, 2013 - Posted by The Mariner
The world of the Deck Cadet,   Once upon a time I posted about what a trainees Sunday schedule would be like under my wing and it got a surprisingly good response, obviously I’m not that harsh after all! Today’s post is a big one, it’s something that I have used for ...
November 23rd, 2012 - Posted by The Mariner
  This post is in association with Ian, originally written for when his Son started going to sea, he has kindly let me post his list and rehash it with my experiences and a few ideas of my own. Ian was Second Officer with Maersk back in the 80’s he also sailed on Tankers, Pr...
November 1st, 2012 - Posted by The Mariner
I don’t mention the engineers in my blog much unless I’m slagging them off for being lucky enough to work 8-5 but they do a great job and this is a post on a little of what they do and the HND training programme that they can follow, engineering covers a great many subjects and...
November 1st, 2012 - Posted by The Mariner
The big difference from the HND option is that foundation degree candidates are expected to go away and learn on their own when work is given, where as the HND is more classroom based learning. The following is written to give you some idea of what you would be studying and when. This is n...
October 29th, 2012 - Posted by The Mariner
  As I have mentioned in previous posts there are a number of ways to qualify as a deck officer or engineering officer, today I will detail the HND phase structures. giving you some idea of what you would be studying and when. This is not a definitive list and the colleges make a big ...
October 11th, 2012 - Posted by The Mariner
  As a qualified seafaring officer, you will be able to work worldwide on many types of ship. This can include but certainly not limited to; cruise ships, ferries, oil and chemical tankers, gas carriers, container ships, bulk carriers, naval and offshore support ships as well as many ...
October 10th, 2012 - Posted by The Mariner
In my quest to find some quality advice and opinions (other than just my own) for joining the Merchant Navy, I inevitably came across some good websites and some excellent blogs, all with a thing or two in common with mine; they want to help and give advice about cadetships, training and l...
October 5th, 2012 - Posted by The Mariner
So Spence reading your grammatically laughable blog has somehow managed to make me want to look a little further into joining the Merchant Navy, what do I do now?     I suggest looking for a nautical college near you, many of them have large open days/ weekends for prospective st...
September 24th, 2012 - Posted by The Mariner
  If you are using this blog to help decide if life at sea is for you, then the following is a little description of what you can expect to be doing with your time on a Sunday at sea!     Firstly, a little for those unfamiliar with the trainee (cadet) program; a cadet [&hell...
September 24th, 2012 - Posted by The Mariner
  Sundays on a ship are almost considered sacred, it’s the day where if you are very lucky you can do a little less work. They work best as an engineer, if they are fortunate enough to not be the duty engineer and the vessel is not carrying out critical operations then they are ...